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Kentucky confirms 6 cases of mysterious form of hepatitis in children

Kentucky confirms 6 cases of mysterious form of hepatitis in children
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Kentucky is investigating 6 possible cases of mysterious form of hepatitis in children



governor. Good afternoon everybody. So could we have the first slide, please, James. We are going to talk about pediatric hepatitis. So the CDC works with state health departments to identify children with hepatitis of unknown cause. It is not uncommon for some causes of hepatitis and children to remain unknown. And it is not yet clear whether there has been an increase in the overall number of children who contract hepatitis. But there have been reports of unusual cases of liver inflammation and children starting in Europe late last year and also in the UK. We have now received reports through the World Health Organization of such liver inflammation. In 20 countries, at least in the United States, there are about 274 cases so far from 39 different states. And in Kentucky, we currently have six cases under investigation. Children in Kentucky range in age from eight months to four years. It is important to note this. This is mainly found in young children. In the current definition of children affected by this, there are children under the age of 10. Unfortunately, uh, sometimes kids need liver transplants because the disease gets so bad, but luckily in Kentucky, none of those individuals, none of those six kids needed a transplant. Now the cause, as I said, is unknown. Uh, they ruled out common causes of hepatitis. So there is hepatitis *** to E or *** variety of viral hepatitis. They also found no link to autoimmune hepatitis or to the Covid 19 virus. No link there either. There is no connection to the COVID-19 vaccine, which is important for people to note. And a lot of those kids weren’t the age where they were even eligible or able to get the *** Covid vaccine, there’s potentially a *** relationship to adenovirus type 41. Now adenoviruses are really, really common. These are the common cold effectively for everyone. These viruses are generally not known to cause liver inflammation and healthy children. And so far, all of these children who have had this inflammation of unknown origin have been children who were previously healthy. Typically, an adenovirus causes mild symptoms like runny nose, cough, fever, sore throat, possibly *** mild gastrointestinal illness, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea. So it’s not typical for this particular infection. If we go to the next slide, please, James. So for the public, what do you need to know? First of all, it’s not something for you to panic or be overly alarmed about. But this is something you need to be careful of. So you want to make sure that if your child has these signs or symptoms that you seek medical evaluation from your pediatrician in a timely manner. So, the most common symptoms that would make this different would be yellowing of the eyes or skin called jaundice. Uh, also, unfortunately, vomiting and diarrhea are common for *** a variety of illnesses, but children who have this severe illness will likely have vomiting and diarrhea and yellowing of the eyes and skin as the condition worsens. Uh, in the patients we’ve tested here in Kentucky. This link with the adenovirus was only found in two of the six cases. And I know it’s scary when your child gets sick and you go to the hospital and see your doctor. You have questions. I want to give you a little insight into this process. First of all, these tests for these viruses are more about helping us understand the public health implications and what we can do through public health to help you stay safe. There is no specific treatment such as an antibiotic or antiviral for adenovirus. If your child becomes sick enough to need medical attention, he may need to be hospitalized for intravenous fluids and other supportive care. Or they may be well enough to be monitored in partnership with your pediatrician with frequent follow-up office visits. Uh, but please understand this. It’s not something you can rush out and take a *** test for. This is something the pediatrician should assess your child and give you personalized medical advice on what to do. So we’re working with clinicians across the state, we’ve sent outreach information. Clinicians can report any cases to the Kentucky Department of Public Health and we ask that you report any cases that you think might fit this case definition and we will work with you to facilitate any necessary testing and provide you with access to any further information we have. who can help you in the treatment of these patients. So folks, Covid has hit us hard, but I think one thing that’s shown is the importance of public health and the things we’re doing This hepatitis, things like peanut butter reminiscent of preps for infants, I think just showing the wide range of things that we rely on for public health in the state. And I just want you to be reassured and know that we have an extensive network *** in the 100 20 counties that works on your behalf and I am very grateful to the governor *** who supports the important work that we do . Thanks.

Kentucky is investigating 6 possible cases of mysterious form of hepatitis in children

There are six possible cases of a mysterious form of hepatitis in children in Kentucky, the Department of Health confirmed Thursday. Reports of unusual cases of liver inflammation began in Europe late last year. This has now been seen in at least 20 countries, and 274 cases have been reported in 39 states, Dr Steven Stack said. Kentucky is investigating six cases involving children ages 8 months to 4 years old. He explained that the cause is unknown, but health officials have ruled out common causes of hepatitis. Stack said while he doesn’t think there’s any reason to panic, it’s important to know the signs: yellow skin and eyes, vomiting, diarrhea and abnormal blood tests. According to Stack, they were able to link two of the cases to adenovirus, which is a very common virus, like a cold or the flu. Children with symptoms should be immediately evaluated by a pediatric specialist. Stack said there was no specific treatment. Some children had to undergo liver transplants, but Stack said that was not the case for children in Kentucky.

There are six possible cases of a mysterious form of hepatitis in children in Kentucky, the Department of Health confirmed Thursday.

Unusual cases of liver inflammation were reported in Europe late last year. This has now been seen in at least 20 countries, and 274 cases have been reported in 39 states, Dr Steven Stack said.

Kentucky is investigating six cases involving children ages 8 months to 4 years old.

He explained that the cause is unknown, but health officials have ruled out common causes of hepatitis.

Stack said while he doesn’t think there’s any reason to panic, it’s important to know the signs: yellow skin and eyes, vomiting, diarrhea and abnormal blood tests.

According to Stack, they were able to link two of the cases to adenovirus, which is a very common virus, like a cold or the flu.

Children with symptoms should be immediately evaluated by a pediatric specialist.

Stack said there was no specific treatment.

Some children had to undergo liver transplants, but Stack said that was not the case for children in Kentucky.

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